JACKSON – MADISON COUNTY REGIONAL

HEALTH DEPARTMENT

804 North Parkway · Jackson, Tennessee 38305 Telephone: (731) 423-3020  ·  Fax: (731) 927-8600

Kimberly L. Tedford, R.N. Director

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

May 2, 2022

Contact: Mallory Cooke 731-267-9961

mcooke@madisoncountytn.gov

 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT URGES HEPATITIS VACCINATION

 

JACKSON, Tenn. – The Jackson-Madison County Regional Health Department joins the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in recognizing May as Hepatitis Awareness Month. We urge citizens to get vaccinated and know their health status.

In the United States, the most common types of viral hepatitis are hepatitis A, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C.

Hepatitis A is a vaccine-preventable, contagious liver infection. It’s usually transmitted through the fecal-oral route or by consuming contaminated food or water. Hepatitis A symptoms include fatigue, low appetite, stomach pain, nausea, and jaundice. People who get hepatitis A usually recover and do not have lasting liver damage. CDC recommends all children get the hepatitis A vaccine at one year of age.

Hepatitis B is a liver infection. It can be transmitted through sexual contact, sharing needles or other drug-injection equipment, or from mother to baby at birth. Chronic hepatitis B infection can cause serious liver damage and liver cancer. CDC recommends the hepatitis B vaccine for all infants at birth and for adults at risk.

“In today’s world of emerging and established diseases that cannot be prevented with vaccinations as of yet, we are lucky to have such a high rate of protection with the hepatitis A and hepatitis B vaccines,” Epidemiologist Shanna Shearon-Wilbanks said.

Hepatitis C is a liver infection. It is usually spread when someone comes into contact with blood from an infected person. In the past, hepatitis C spread through blood transfusions and organ transplants. Today, most people become infected by sharing needles or other equipment to inject drugs. Hepatitis C can lead to liver disease, liver failure, liver cancer, and death. There is currently no vaccine to prevent hepatitis C. It can be treated and even cured. People with hepatitis C often have no symptoms. CDC recommends anyone born from 1945- 1965, as well as anyone else at risk, get tested.

The Jackson-Madison County Regional Health Department offers hepatitis A and hepatitis B vaccinations as well as hepatitis C testing through our sexually transmitted infection clinic. “Hepatitis is a serious, but preventable virus if the proper preventative steps are taken such as

 

OPERATED IN COOPERATION WITH THE TENNESSEE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

 

vaccination, making healthy lifestyle choices, and knowing your health status,” Shearon- Wilbanks said.

 

Call 731-423-3020 for more information or to schedule an appointment to be vaccinated or tested.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.